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Pupil Premium

 

Schools receive £1,320 for any child who has been eligible for free school meals during the last six years. They also receive £1,900 for pupils who are looked after by the local authority or who are in care for adoption, guardianship and two other ‘orders.’ This money is known as the Pupil Premium Grant (PPG).

 

Our children have different barriers to learning; the most common barriers for our disadvantaged children are that they are less likely to have support at home with their learning and less new and exciting opportunities. They may also have weaker language and communication skills and they are more likely to have significant issues in basic Literacy and Numeracy skills. Some of our disadvantaged children also have poor attendance and punctuality, low confidence, resilience and aspirations. We carefully plan how our funding is spent and research the most effective strategies to help overcome these barriers. We analyse the impact of our strategies to ensure they are helping to diminish the difference between the attainment of our disadvantaged children compared to other children both in school and nationally. All of our disadvantaged children benefit from the strategies that we have in place.

 

 

At Regents Park Community Primary School, we recognise that high quality teaching and interventions are the most effective strategies to diminishing the difference between the achievements of our disadvantaged children compared to other pupils. We use the funding to ensure our children benefit from having individual and small group support in each year group as well as being taught in smaller groups in year 6. We have also spent more funding on Early Years intervention in order to diminish the difference between disadvantaged and other children at an earlier age as research suggests this is one of the most effective strategies. We have recently implemented Sound Training and we will be starting to use the Accelerated Reader Scheme.

 

We recognise that some children can be helped to reach their potential through having targeted support for their social, emotional and behaviour needs therefore the funding subsidies the cost of our play therapist, speech and language therapist, learning mentor’s salaries and the cost of breakfast club. We have also recently used the funding to build a sensory room to support children with additional needs. 

 

The funding is also used to give our pupils new opportunities and experiences such as working with an artist, learning to play a musical instrument, sessions with the mad scientists, learning French and activities in our forest school. The funding also pays for the cost of the school minibus to enable our children to have more educational visits and links with other schools so they can continue to have exciting and new opportunities. Please look at our Creative Arts and Forest school pages on the website as well as our twitter page to see the exciting things our children have been doing.

 

We would encourage any eligible parents/carers to apply for free school meals as it helps us to fund additional support for individual learners. This can be in the form of learning interventions, pastoral support and it is used to provide extra-curricular and new opportunities for the children. If you are unsure about your eligibility please contact school for further information.

 

 

2016/17

The total allocation for this academic year for pupil premium children is £326,040 which is £1,320 per pupil.

247 (46%) of our pupils received the funding.

The planned investment for this academic year is:

2016/17 Pupil Premium Spend - Description

Extra-curricular/new opportunities

Pastoral

Support

Learning

Interventions/

resources

Cost

% of Pupil Premium

 Intervention teaching - early years and year 6

 

 

ü

50,223

15.40%

Breakfast Club staffing, resources and equipment

 

ü

ü

15,949

4.89%

Close the gap resources: Accelerated Reading programme whole school reading scheme, phonics audit, phonics play club resources, sound training,

 

 

ü

24,000

7%

Enhancement and new opportunities: Artist in residence, learning to play musical instruments, French tuition, mad science sessions, educational visits, author workshops, subsidised residential educational visits, Language Alive sessions

ü

ü

ü

23,000

6.8%

Forest schools – resources and training

ü

ü

ü

2,000

0.6%

Contribution towards salary of senior staff for interventions including Early Years, breakfast club staffing, forest school teacher, learning mentors and after school tuition

 

ü

ü

223,739

65.7%

Minibus for educational visits and extra-curricular/new opportunities - contribution toward running costs

ü

 

ü

14,530

4.3%

Outdoor learning bus - contribution toward conversion, school radio, library and newspaper

ü

 

ü

30,000

8.8%

Pastoral support: play therapist,  speech and language therapist, well-being crew

 

ü

 

16,000

4.7%

Unspent current balance

 

 

 

5,291

1.6%

 

There is also an additional £5,438 for pupil premium children in Early Years

The planned investment for this academic year is to spend the funding on Numeracy resources and Playclub resources to improve children’s communication and language Literacy skills and Maths skills. The funding will also be used to enhance the outdoor area to improve the children’s physical development and on educational visits and visitors to provide new opportunities and experiences and to improve the children’s  language development.

 

2015/16

The total allocation for this academic year for pupil premium children was £326,040 which is £1,320 per pupil.

247 (46%) of our pupils received the funding.

There is also an additional £5,438 for pupil premium children in Early Years

Investment for this academic year was spent on the following:

 

2015/16 Pupil Premium Spend - Description

Extra-curricular/new opportunities

Pastoral

Support

Learning

Interventions/

resources

Cost

% of Pupil Premium

 Intervention teaching - early years and year 6

 

 

ü

50,223

15.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Breakfast Club staffing, resources and equipment

 

ü

ü

15,949

4.89%

Close the gap resources: Numicon maths resources, phonics and guided reading resources, IT resources, SATS study guides and booster classes

 

 

ü

31,350

9.62%

Enhancement and new opportunities: Artist in residence, learning to play musical instruments, French tuition, mad science sessions, educational visits, author workshops, forest school resources, magical maths workshops, subsidised residential educational visits

ü

ü

ü

30,835

9.46%

Forest school teacher - contribution toward salary

ü

ü

ü

3,662

1.12%

Forest schools - resources and equipment

ü

ü

ü

3,610

1.11%

Learning Mentors - contribution toward salary

 

ü

 

28,677

8.80%

Minibus for educational visits and extra-curricular/new opportunities - contribution toward running costs

ü

 

ü

19,570

6.00%

Outdoor learning bus - contribution toward conversion

ü

 

 

17,250

5.29%

Pastoral support: play therapist,  speech and language therapist school uniform, sensory room resources

 

ü

 

14,728

4.52%

Reading Recovery Teacher

 

 

ü

21,081

6.47%

Senior staff - contribution toward salaries of senior leaders who carry out learning interventions in every phase

 

 

ü

59,150

18.14%

Teacher Training (TEEP)

 

 

ü

4,223

1.30%

Teaching Assistant - additional TA

 

ü

ü

10,200

3.13%

Tuition - before and after school small group teaching

 

ü

ü

13,984

4.29%

Unspent balance – carried forward 2016/17

 

 

 

1,548

0.54%

 

Additional funding was also spent on the enhancement of the Early Years Outdoor classroom and on resources to improve language development and basic Literacy and Numeracy skills.

 

 

2014/2015

The total allocation for this academic year for pupil premium children was £302,967 which is £1,323 per child.

229 (45%) of our pupils received the funding.

The spending of the funding last year is outlined below:

 

Description

Extra-Curricular/

New Opportunities

Pastoral Support

Learning Interventions

 

 

 

COST

% of PP allocation

Contribution to salaries – mentors, breakfast club staff, teaching assistants

 

ü

 

ü

 

ü

£149,947

 

49.5%

Agency support teachers, after school tuition

 

 

ü

£37,176

12.3%

Phonics resources and reading books

 

 

ü

£10,216

3.4%

Music Service and Artist in residence – choir, small singing groups, musical instrument lessons, subsidised educational visits, ICT resources, bicycles and safety equipment

ü

 

ü

ü

£23,150

 

7.6%

Cost of the school minibus and minibus training

ü

ü

 

£14,080

4.6%

Creation of the forest school and training

ü

ü

ü

£39,870

13.2%

Creation of the sensory room and resources, play therapist

ü

ü

 

£21,716

7.2%

 

Summary of data and strengths

Until more national data is available all data is a comparison of disadvantaged and other children in school and to all children nationally.

Strengths

-The gap between the numbers of disadvantaged children compared to other children working at a typical level development in Nursery has closed.

 

-More disadvantaged children achieved a good level of development in Reception and this has increased by 3% from last year (63% in 2016)

 

-Our KS2 SPAG data shows our disadvantaged children out performed other children in school and our disadvantaged children did as well as other children nationally

 

-Our baseline data for this year shows our disadvantaged children are out performing other children in Reading, Writing and Maths in year 6 and in Writing and Maths in year 2

 

-Disadvantaged children made the same or more progress than other children in reading and maths last year (see table below)

 

-The Playclub Project has improved standards of writing, reading and communication in Early Years and our practice has been shared with other schools who said they felt inspired by the project. We will be continuing to work with other schools this year by implementing new playclub resources.

 

-Some of our disadvantaged children started at grammar school in September.

 

 -Our disadvantaged children have lots of new experiences and opportunities. One child in year 1 was offered a scholarship with the Birmingham Royal Ballet after working with them in school.

 

-Last year children from year 4 and 5 completed their Arts Award from Trinity College as part of the ‘Big Read’ project. They were invited to the children’s hospital to present £1000 that the school has raised. Their work has been displayed in the Mailbox and the children have been in the Birmingham Mail and on BBC radio to talk about the project and what they do as charity champions for the children’s hospital.

 

We recognise that we still have work to do to diminish the difference but we are pleased that the gap is narrowing and with the progress that our pupil premium children make.

The table below shows the percentage of children who made 2 steps progress or more from the end of autumn 2015 to the end of Summer 2016.

 

Year Group

Reading

Writing

Maths

 

     pp

    other

difference

pp

other

difference

pp

other

difference

1

96%

96%

same

70%

80%

-10%

93%

92%

+1%

2

92%

91%

+1%

88%

91%

-3%

92%

91%

+1%

3

99%

99%

same

97%

99%

-2%

97%

96%

+1%

4

96%

96%

same

96%

97%

-1%

96%

97%

-1%

5

74

70

+4%

89

93

-4%

96

89

+7%

6

79

76

+3%

62

60

+2%

93

91

+2%

 

The table below shows how in 2014 there was a big gap between the percentages of pupils who were disadvantaged that achieved a Good Level of Development (GLD) in Reception compared to other children. This gap has now closed and disadvantaged children are performing as well as other children in school. We are aware that there is still a gap between the percentages of children at Regents Park (both disadvantaged and other) that achieve GLD compared to other children nationally as last year this figure was 69%. We are working hard to close this gap.

 

 

Percentage of pupils achieving a good level of development (GLD)

2014

Percentage of pupils achieving a good level of development (GLD)

2015

Percentage of pupils achieving a good level of development (GLD)

2016

disadvantaged children

25%

60%

63%

other children

65%

60%

63%

difference

-40%

no gap

no gap

 

 

KS2 SATS results

The data from 2014/15 shows our disadvantaged children out performed national pupil premium children in all areas with the exception of reading in KS2. There was however still a gap between the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils and other pupils in school and a gap between our disadvantaged pupils and other pupils nationally which we are working hard to close.

 

The tables below show our KS2 SATS results for 2015/16.

 

Reading

Writing

Maths

SPAG

Combined Reading, writing and Maths

% of disadvantaged children at A and above in school

 

    66%

% of disadvantaged children at A and above

 

    73%

% of disadvantaged children at A and above in school

 

       68%

 

   78%

 

      46%

% of other children at A and above in school

        

    70%

 

% of  other children at A and above in school

 

      80%

% of  other children at A and above in school

 

       85%

 

   75%

 

        70%

 

Difference in school

      

   -4%

 

 

Difference in school

 

      -7%

 

 

Difference in school

 

      -17%

 

   +3%

 

       -24%

 

Our disadvantaged children do less well than other children in school in reading, writing and maths, however the gaps are small in writing and reading and they perform better in SPAG than other children.

 

Reading

Writing

Maths

SPAG

Combined Reading, writing and Maths

% of disadvantaged children at A and above in school

 

    66%

% of disadvantaged children at A and above

 

       73%

% of disadvantaged children at A and above in school

 

        68%

 

    78%

 

       46%

% of other children at A above nationally

    71%

% of all national children at A and above

     79%

% of all national children at A and above

         75%

   78%

       60%

Difference

 

    -5%

Difference

       -6%

Difference

       -7%

     0%

      -14%

 

Our disadvantaged children do less well than other children nationally in reading, writing and maths; however they perform as well as other children nationally in SPAG.

Please read the report attached on our Pupil Premium review which took place in November 2016.

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